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Activity 1: Pocket Mods

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Website: www.pocketmods.com
This interactive site allows you to format "little books" for your classroom and tailor them to meet your students needs. You can choose from a variety of formats to include on the different pages of your book. Options include: large lines, small lines, story board, a music staff sheet, music tab sheet, large/small grid paper, conversion tables, math formulas, calendars and folding guides.

Ideas for your interactive notebook:
  • Jigsaw the Reading: Jigsaw the reading of a text between groups of the classroom. Each group can become an expert on their "piece." Then, have students give one and get one with other groups' members; filling out their books. Review with the class key points. Have students write these main points in red if they are not already in their books. Use an envelope to store the books in the notebook. Envelopes work well on the back of divider pages in the notebook.
  • Vocabulary: Choose 6-7 Vocabulary words. Using the story board format have students draw a picture of the word or use it in a sentence with a context clue. Then, underneath they can provide the definition.
  • Math: Have students create a step by step manual to complete a concept in math. On each page have them show the step and then an explanation in their own words. Have students share their books with a partner and recount their explanations.



aurasma-logo.jpgActivity 2: Aurasma: Explain a Diagram, Picture, or Graph

Website: www.aurasma.com
Auras allow you to augment the world around you to help your students understand an assignment or further explain a concept. Aurasma recognizes objects and pictures and amplifies it by connecting the picture to a video, picture, or text. This FREE app has unlimited possibilities in the classroom.

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Ideas for your interactive notebook:
  • Math: Provide students with a graph. Create a video, take a picture of the graph and help students work through create a graph like the one pictured at right. Great for students who need help walking through a problem or needing directions read to them.
  • ESL: Take pictures of objects around the classroom. Have students practice labeling the objects. Then, have students scan the object and see if they got the label correct.
  • Reading/ Language Arts: Have students create a review of a book. Take a picture of a book and have the students record a review of the book.




Activity 3: Word SiftWordsift.jpg
Website: www.wordsift.com
Wordsift helps students sift through written text. They simply cut and paste any text into WordSift and a word cloud is created is clickable. Students can then click a word and view visual images of the word along with a visual thesaurus. Using the workspace students can create a visual representation of unknown words, assisting in vocabulary development.



Ideas for your interactive notebook:
  • Reading, Social Studies, or Science: Copy and paste in a piece of text that students will be reading. Sift the text and create a workspace. Students can drag words and pictures into the workspace while previewing the text. Have students make a prediction based upon the words that showed up larger than the rest. Print the word cloud off and paste it in the notebook. As students read the text have them add words to the word cloud that they thought were important while reading. Then, have them justify their additions.
  • Cross Curricular Teaming for Teachers: Word sift allows users to sort the words into several categories. These include: Academic Word Lists (AWL), General Service Word Lists (GSW, the top 2,000 words used in the English Language), Language Arts, Math, Science, and Social Studies words. If you are planning on reading a text, sift the words into categories. Instead of having to directly instruct students on 20 words, you may cut down your list considerably if they learn a few of the words in different classes. This creates a bridge between all core subjects and promotes a community of learners.

Non-Fiction Reading Passages 3-10th grade: http://teacher.depaul.edu/Nonfiction_Readings.htm


Practice NESA-R 7th Grade Passage: http://www.education.ne.gov/assessment/pdfs/NE002_R_07_Practice_Paper.pdf

Middle Level Vocabulary and Non Fiction Reading Passages (Cross-Curricular): http://wg.serpmedia.org/download.html



Activity 4: Prezi as a Glossary/Term Listprezi_example.jpg

Website: http://prezi.com
Prezi is an "online" presentation tool that rotates and zooms to give your presentation a very different look and feel. If you are looking for an alternative to the traditional Power Point--this is the tool for you. I have found that this is an easy way to introduce and review vocabulary for my students.
  • Vocabulary, SPED: In a notebook students keep a glossary at the front or back. Many students do not have the capacity to correctly write down vocabulary terms, definitions, and examples. Use the Prezi tool as an online, growing glossary. Using a QR code copy the URL for the Prezi and print them on stickers. Give the QR codes for the students this can be used over and over as long as you continue to use the same Prezi Wall. That way, if students did not correctly write down a term they have a correct copy to review and study from along with
  • Teaching Ideas & Example: http://prezi.com/rn0e0_mfq1qc/short-story-vocabulary/




Activity 5: Fur.ly Condensing Multiple URL's into One

Website: http://fur.ly/
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Fur.ly condenses multiple URLs into one easy, editable URL. Great for teachers to use for lessons, webquest-type activities, and research projects. Instead of struggling to type in the various URLs they can focus on the content. Simple and very easy to use for ANY teacher.

Ideas for your interactive notebook:
  • Reading, Social Studies, or Science: Have students preview sites based upon the content. Then, in their notebooks have students create a graffiti board to symbolize what they learned from the sites. Have the students give one and get one with partners around the room. Then, have the students create a prediction about the material and what they will learn.
  • Online Textbooks: Most textbooks have online editions and materials available. Condense the URLs for all of your students textbooks into one easy URL. For added convenience create a QR code for your fur.ly creation.


Activity 6: Quick Response Codes and Readers

QR Reader for Mac: http://itunes.apple.com/us/app/qr-reader-for-
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iphone/id368494609?mt=8

QR Reader for Android: http://www.appbrain.com/app/quickmark-qr-code-reader/tw.com.quickmark
QR Generators: http://qrcode.kaywa.com
Use a QR Generator to create a QR (Quick Reference) code that can contain text, a web site, a URL that links to an audio file, movie file, etc. Use a QR generator to create a code that can be
read by an iPad, iPod, iPhone, laptop, Android, etc. For vocabulary, a teacher can create a QR code with the correct word and then in a presentation, on flash cards, etc. the teacher could put the definition and students could scan the QR code to check their answers. This has been used on a whiteboard, on a bulletin board, in PowerPoint, etc. One teacher created a jeopardy game with the QR code in the lower right corner of the question that was scanned to reveal the answer.
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Ideas for your interactive notebook:
  • Reading, Social Studies, or Science: Copy and paste in a piece of text that students will be reading. Sift the text and create a workspace. Students can drag words and pictures into the workspace while previewing the text. Have students make a prediction based upon the words that showed up larger than the rest. Print the word cloud off and paste it in the notebook. As students read the text have them add words to the word cloud that they thought were important while reading. Then, have them justify their additions.
  • Cross Curricular Teaming for Teachers: Word sift allows users to sort the words into several categories. These include: Academic Word Lists (AWL), General Service Word Lists (GSW, the top 2,000 words used in the English Language), Language Arts, Math, Science, and Social Studies words. If you are planning on reading a text, sift the words into categories. Instead of having to directly instruct students on 20 words, you may cut down your list considerably if they learn a few of the words in different classes. This creates a bridge between all core subjects and promotes a community of learners.